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THE CALL OF NATURE 
SHOULDN'T COST THE EARTH

The facts around what happens when we throw more than Poo Pee and Paper down the toilet. 

CITY OF GREATER GEELONG REPORTS BLOCKAGES

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When using toilet facilities, please help our community by disposing of wet wipes correctly.

Baby wipes, make up wipes, and even wipes advertised as ‘flushable’ don’t break down in the sewerage system, and can cause blockages and overflows.

Our crews were required to remove a metre-long blockage from the toilet system at Eastern Beach over the long weekend – this was caused by a failure of the sewerage pipe due to a significant number of wipes being flushed down the toilet.

The Cunningham Pier toilets were also clogged during this time.

Please do the right thing to respect the facilities by throwing all wipes and items like nappies, cotton buds and sanitary items in the bin.

Source: City of Greater Geelong

WET WIPES IN THE TOILET?

While the actions you take in your own household might seem small, you’re one of nearly 5 million people contributing to Sydney’s wastewater every day. We’re all connected, so what you do can make a big difference.

The 2 main causes of blocked pipes are:

  • flushing wet wipes, cotton buds, sanitary products and other rubbish down the toilet

  • putting cooking fats, oils, grease and food scraps down the sink.

Take a look behind the scenes at our new  promotion and watch as Shane Jacobson explains why this campaign is so important.

Source: Sydney Water #areyouflushingkiddingme

ESTIMATE THAT BLOCKAGES COSTING URBAN WATER INDUSTRY IN AUSTRALIAN OVER 15 MILLION EACH YEAR

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The Water Service Association of Australia estimates that blockages caused by wet wipes are costing urban water industry in Australia over 15 million each year.

 

“We work really hard to retrieve wet wipes from sewers, but we do still sometimes get a build-up of them which can cause blockages, inconveniences to customers and harm to the environment.  “Add fats and oils that people pour down the drain and the fatberg is born,”

Mr McCafferty Yarra Valley Water

WHAT IS A FATBERG & WHAT EFFECT DOES IT HAVE ON OUR ENVIRONMENT?

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The term “fatberg” was coined in 2015 and is a play on the word iceberg, only instead of ice, it’s made of fat. A fatberg is a congealed mass of non-biodegradeable waste that collects and forms in sewer systems. Usually this mass doesn’t contain fecal matter or toilet paper, but it does contain things like wet wipes, cooking fat, sanitary napkins, condoms, cotton balls and cotton swabs, and more. Fatbergs can be colossal, and can clog entire sewer systems, causing overflows in sewer systems, and they are as hard or harder than rocks.

source: ecosource

PETROL TANK-SIZED, 42-TONNE 'FATBERG' FOUND IN MELBOURNE SEWER

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A 42-tonne fatberg – a giant mass of congealed wet wipes, cloth and oils flushed into our drains and toilets – that was found north of Melbourne is the biggest authorities have seen in the state.

The massive blockage was not related to recent toilet paper shortages, though plumbers have reported a rise in blocked drains with people turning to a range of less suitable substitute materials.

The Age - April 15 2020

THE BIGGEST RECORDED 'FATBERG', WEIGHING 130 TONNES AND STRETCHING 250 METRES, WAS FOUND IN THE SEWERS OF LONDON IN 2013

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Let's not go there again. More recently: A 40-tonne fatberg the size of a double-decker bus has been cleared from a London sewer by Thames Water engineers who pulled out some of it by hand.

The Guardian - Oct 2019

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